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Name of study:  NEOMYSIS/ZOOPLANKTON PROJECT

      Program manager
                  Name:  James Orsi
                Agency:  California Dept of Fish and Game -
			 Bay-Delta Division

               Address:  4001 N. Wilson Way, Stockton Ca.  95205

                 Phone:  (209) 942-6087
                         Note:  This phone is set up TDD operation.
                                If you want to talk with James Orsi
                                you must use a TDD device or phone
                                him through the California Relay
                                Service.  Otherwise you may call
                                Lee Mecum at (209) 942 6088.

Purpose/Objective:
     Monitoring of abundance of Neomysis mercedis and zooplankton
     in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary.

Geographic range of field work:
     Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary including San Pablo Bay,
     Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, the Sacramento river upstream to
     Hood, the San Joaquin River upstream to Stockton and the
     southern Delta to Clifton Court.

Number of sites:
     A total of 81 sites have been sampled at various times during
     the life of the project.  However, on no survey were all
     stations sampled.  Only 35 sites have been sampled every year
     since 1968.

Period of record (Start year):
     Neomysis: 1968.
     Zooplankton: 1972.

Size for complete data base for program element in KB (MB): Approx.
     13.5 MB.

Number of individual files:
     48; one Neomysis file for each year from 1968 - 1993 and one
     zooplankton file for each year from 1972 - 1993.  

Sample frequency per time unit (second, week, month):
     1971: One survey per month from June, 1968 through December.

     1972: One survey per month from January through March, two
     surveys per month from April through October.

     1973 - 1974: One survey in March, Two surveys per month April
     through October, one survey in November.

     1975: One survey in February, two surveys per month March
     through October, one survey in November.

     1976: One survey in March, two surveys per month April through
     October, one survey in November and December.

     1977: One survey per month January through March, two surveys
     per month April through October, one survey in November and
     December.

     1978 - 1982: One survey in January and February, two surveys
     per month march through October, one survey in November and
     December.

     1983: One survey in January and February, two surveys per
     month March Through October, one survey in November.

     1984 - 1985: Two surveys per month March through October,One
     survey in November.

     1986: One survey in March, two surveys per month April through
     October, one survey in November.

     1987: Two surveys per month March through October, one survey
     in November.

     1988 - 1993: One survey in March, two surveys per month April
     through October, one survey in November.

     1994 - 1995: One survey each month January through December.

General category of data collected (e.g., media, flow, physical,
     common chemicals, metals, pesticides, nutrients, chlorophyll,
     fish, invertebrates, or phyto/zooplankton):

     Temperature, Secchi disc, electro-conductivity, chlorophyll a,
     Neomysis, copepoda, cladocera, rotifers, barnacle nauplii and
     crab zoea.  Acanthomysis data collection started in 1994.

Comments about element (e.g., idiosyncracies, changes over time,
     special events, etc.):  Chlorophyll a was not sampled until
     1976.  Time of day was not added to the data until 1987.
     Introduced zooplankton taxa have been added to the data base
     as they were discovered and identified.
     In 1994 the sampling schedule was changed to one survey per
     month with all 12 months sampled.  The number of stations
     sampled was reduced to 15 and sampling in San Pablo Bay and
     Carquinez Strait was suspended.
     Acanthomysis began appearing in the Neomysis net and was
     included in the data in 1994.Field Sampling

     Gear type or field instrument used:
     Three types of sampling gear have been used by the project; a
     Neomysis net, a Clarke-Bumpus net and a pump.

     The Neomysis net, from 1968 through 1970, was made of 1 mm
     silk bolting cloth, was 1 m long and had a mouth area of 0.1
     m2.  From 1971 through 1973 the Neomysis net was made of 0.93
     mm mesh nylon cloth, had a 30 cm mouth diameter and was 0.7 m
     long.  From 1994 to the present, the mesh size has been 0.505
     mm, the mouth diameter 30 cm and the length 1.48 m.  All
     Neomysis nets tapered to 76 mm at the cod end where a
     polyethylene jar screened with 0.505 mesh wire cloth captured
     the Mysids.

     The Clarke-Bumpus net was made of 154 mesh nylon cloth (No. 10
     mesh), had a mouth diameter of 10 cm, and a length of 73 cm.
     It tapered to 45 mm at the cod end.  The organisms were
     captured by a stainless steel bottle with a screened opening.

     The nets were mounted on a tubular steel frame.  The Clarke-
     Bumpus net was mounted directly above the Neomysis net.

     Until 1973, Pygmy flow meters were used to estimate water
     volumes filtered by the Neomysis net.  From 1974 to present
     General Oceanics model 2030 flow meters have been used.

     The pump had a capacity of 15 l/min and was connected to a
     15 m long hose which had a weighted nozzle at the lower end.

Brief description of sampling procedure, including sub-sampling,
     sorting, identification of organisms  (this should include
     procedures for transport of sample from field to lab):  

     Samples were taken from a 19 ft boat equipped with an "A"
     frame.  The nets were towed from bottom to surface in a
     stepwise oblique tow lasting ten minutes.

     Microzooplankton were taken at the end of the tow by pumping
     several liters of water into a 19 l carboy while the hose was
     raised from bottom to surface.  The carboy was shaken and a
     1.5 to 1.9 liter subsample drawn.

     Surface temperature, Secchi disc reading and surface electro-
     conductivity were taken at the start of the tow.  Electro-
     conductivity was standardized to 25 C.  From 1982 to present
     surface and bottom pre- and post-tow EC's have been taken at
     stations where pre-tow EC was >= 1000 uS/cm.

     Chlorophyll a measurement began in 1976.  A 2.8 liter bottle
     was filled approximately half full with water pumped from a
     depth of 1 meter.  Two 100 ml sub-samples were drawn and
     aspirated through 47 mm diameter glass fiber filters of 0.3 um
     pore size.  The filters were frozen on dry ice.  Chlorophyll
     a concentrations were measured at the Sacramento laboratory of
     the Federal Bureau of reclamation.

     Biological samples were preserved in 10% formalin with Rose
     Bengal dye added to aid in separating the animals from
     detritus and algae.

Reference to any written protocols and how to obtain a copy:
     Contact project leader.

Changes in gear or procedures which affected the data over time:

     As noted above the Neomysis net has been changed twice since
     the project began.

Laboratory analysis - Chemical
     Name and address of laboratory(s) running analysis:

     California Dept of Fish and Game  4001 n. Wilson Way,
     Stodkton, Ca.  95204.

Current since (date):  June, 1968.

Historical lab (if known) or reference to other documentation:

     Same as above. 

Analytical methodology for each parameter or group of parameters:

     The acidificatation method was used in measuring Chlorophyll
     a concentration.

Reference to table which lists detection limits for each parameter:

Current procedure since (date):  1968.

Historical procedures (if known) or reference to other
      documentation:

Quality assurance/control (QA/QC) protocols (if brief) or one-line
    qualifier:


Reference to any written QA/QC protocols and how to obtain a copy:

Laboratory analysis - Biological

     Name and address of laboratory(s) running analysis:
     All biological analysis was performed by project staff at the
     Ca. Dept of Fish and Game Bay-Delta office in Stockton (4001
     N. Wilson Way, Stockton, Ca. 95205).

     Current since (date):
          June, 1968 for Neomysis.
          January, 1972 for other zooplankton.

     Historical lab (if known) or reference to other documentation:

Methodology for each analysis:

     Neomysis:

     Current procedure since June, 1968.
     Neomysis samples were spread evenly in a square tray equipped
     with removable partitions for subsampling.  Samples which
     appeared to have more than 400 specimens were divided into 4,
     16, or 64 subsamples.  All Mysids in a selected subsample were
     counted.  Prior to 1984 a minimum count of 220 was required.
     This was increased to 400 in 1984.  The first Mysids counted
     were measured to the nearest millimeter from the eye to the
     base of the telson.  Beginning in 1976 they were identified as
     being juvenile, gravid female, non-gravid female or male.

     The total number of Neomysis per cubic meter of water sampled
     was calculated using the following equation:

                         N = T(s/v)
          Where: N = the number of Neomysis per cubic meter
                 T = the mean number of mysids counted in tray
                 segment(s) subsampled
                 S = the number of tray segments
                 V = the volume of water filtered through the net
                 (m3)

     Acanthomysis:
     Current procedure since January, 1994.
     Same procedure as Neomysis.

     Zooplankton:

     Current procedure since January, 1972.
     Clarke-Bumpus samples were concentrated by pouring them
     through a cup screened with 154 um mesh wire cloth.  Water was
     then added to the sample and the volume recorded.  The sample
     was stirred to distribute the animals homogenously and a 1 ml
     subsample extracted with an automatic pipet and placed in a
     Sedgwick-Rafter cell.  All animals were identified and counted
     under a compound microscope.  Additional 1 ml subsamples were
     examined until at least 200 animals had been counted.

     The number per cubic meter for each zooplankton taxon taken in
     the Clarke-Bumpus net was calculated as follows:

                         Z = CV/S/N

          Where: Z = the number of zooplankton per cubic meter
                 C = the number of specimens counted
                 V = the sample volume
                 S = the number of sedgewick-Rafter Cells counted
                 N = the volume of water strained by the net (m3)

     Pump samples were processed by measuring and recording the
     sample volume, then concentrating the sample by pouring it
     through a cup with 154 um mesh followed by one with 43 um
     mesh.  The organisms retained by the 43 um mesh were
     identified and counted in a Sedgewick-Rafter cell.

     The number of organisms per cubic meter taken in the pump
     samples was calculated by the equation:

                         M = C(L/V)

          Where: M = the number of organisms per cubic meter
                 C = the number of specimens counted
                 L = the number of milliliters in 1 cubic meter
                 V = the sample volume in milliliters

     The numbers per cubic meter in the Clarke-Bumpus and pump
     samples were summed for nauplii and rotifers to obtain the
     total number of these organisms per cubic meter.  Nauplii and 
     rotifers had a size range that made them vulnerable to both
     types of sampling gear.

     Historical procedures (if known) or reference to other
     documentation:

     References used for identification of organisms:

     Brooks, John Langdon.
          1957  The systematics of North American Daphnia.  Memoirs
	 	of the Connecticut Academy of Arts & Sciences  Vol
                XIII.

     Donner, Josef.
          1966  Rotifers.  Trans. by H. G. S. Wright.
                Fredick Warne & Co. Ltd.  New York.

     Light, S. F., Ralph I. Smith, Frank A. Pitelka, Donald P.
     Abbot and Frances M. Weesner.
          1954  Intertidal invertebrates of the Central California
                coast.  Univ of California Press.

     Pennak, Robert W.
          1978  Fresh-water invertebrates of the United States
                2nd Ed.  John Wiley & Sons.  New York.

     Tattersall, W. M. and Olive S. Tattersall.
          1951  The Brittish Mysidacea.  The Ray Society.  London.

     Ward, Hennry Baldwin, George Chandler Whipple and W. T.
     Edmondson.
          1959  Fresh-water Biology 2nd ed.  John Wiley & Sons.
                New York.

Location of reference collection (if one exists):
     Ca. Dept. of Fish and Game, Bay-Delta Division Stockton, Ca.

Reference to table listing scientific name, common name (if any),
     and code used:
     See data file format tables listed in the Format file.